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Sheriff's Department

Sheriff's DepartmentINTRODUCTION

Each Grand Jury is required to inquire into the conditions and management of the prisons within the control of the City and County of San Francisco.

The 1998-1999 Civil Grand Jury made visits to all the jails under the jurisdiction of the City and County of San Francisco. The inmate facility, located at San Francisco General Hospital, was also visited.

FACILITY LOCATIONS

County Jail #1
6th Floor, Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St., San Francisco, 94103
Telephone 553-1430

County Jail #2
7th Floor, Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St., San Francisco, 94103
Telephone 553-1851

County Jail #3
San Bruno, Main Jail
1 Moreland Drive, San Bruno, 94066
Telephone (650) 266-9300

County Jail #5
San Francisco General Hospital-Ward 7D/7L
1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, 94110
Telephone 553-1098

County Jail #7
San Bruno, Program Facility
1 Moreland Drive, San Bruno, 94066
Telephone (650) 266-9500

County Jail #8
San Francisco Program Facility
425 - 7th Street, San Francisco, 94103
Telephone 522-8000

County Jail #9
Intake/Release Center
425 - 7th Street, San Francisco, 94103
Telephone 522-8000

Administration Section
1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, Room 456
City Hall, San Francisco, 94102
Telephone 554-7225

Alternative Program
555 - 7th Street, Room 201
San Francisco, CA 94103
Telephone 558-2470

Treasure Island "Brig"
Treasure Island

MAXIMUM INMATE CAPACITY AT JAILS
FACILITY DESIGNATION

INMATE CAPACITY

   

S.F.S.D.

B.O.C.

County Jail #l

Male

392

360

Female

56

66

Total

458

426

County Jail #2

Male

326

273

SW Male (Wks)

54

58

SW (Post 28)

50

-

GYM

26

-

Female

58

43

Total

438

374

County Jail #3

Male Total

750

557

County Jail #5

S.F.G.H. 7D

Male & Female

11

-

County Jail #5

S.F.G.H. 7L

Male & Female

12

-

County Jail #7

Male Total

336

336

County Jail #8

GP Male

242

248

GP Female

142

144

Pod C-Psych M/F

38

-

Pod C-Med/F

38

-

Total

456

392

County Jail #9

(Holding Only)

Male/Female

301

-

OVERALL TOTALS

2,362

2,085

Treasure Island "Brig" not included at this time.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS PROVIDED FOR INMATES - SHERIFF'S ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS

 

Personal service contracts agreements have been entered into by the Sheriff's Department and the following organizations.

 

RESIDENTIAL COUNTY PAROLE

NAME OF PROVIDER
ANNUAL CONTRACT LIMIT

Asian American Recovery Services, Inc.

$62,415.00

Jelani House

83,200.00

Linda Connelly & Associates

292,000.00

Liberation House, Inc.

416,000.00

Milestone Human Services

925,145.00

Walden House

1,161,210.00


DESCRIPTION

Prisoners are placed in licensed residential substance abuse programs after a minimum of 30 days of in-jail program participation. Program placement is until the jail sentence would have otherwise been completed. This program was authorized by PC 3076 and established in 1993.

ELIGIBILITY

  1. Referrals by sentencing court or court order authorizations for unsentenced prisoners.
  2. County Parole Board consideration of jailed prisoners after minimum 30 days.
  3. No fee is to be charged inmates for this program.

LOCATIONS (San Francisco)

Asian American Recovery Center - 2024 Hayes Street

Jelani House - 1601 Quesdad Street

Linda Connelly & Associates - 594 Howard Street

Liberation House, Inc. - 1724 Steiner Street

Milestone Human Services - 291 - Tenth Street

Walden House - 815 Buena Vista West

HOME DETENTION

DESCRIPTION

Prisoners are confined in their home except for pre-approved periods of employment, schooling, or counseling. Compliance with the curfew is verified by electronic equipment installed in the prisoner's home. A radio-signal anklet and a video monitor confirms the prisoner's presence in the home. DUI offenders have a breath alcohol tester installed in their homes. This program was authorized by PC 1203.016 and established in 1989.

ELIGIBILITY

1. Referrals by sentencing court in lieu of jail.

  • Court order authorization for non-sentenced prisoners.
  • $50.00 registration plus $30.00 per day (based on ability to pay).

SWAP/PREP

DESCRIPTION

Sheriff's Work Alternative Program (SWAP) and Post Release Program (PREP) are located at 930 Bryant Street. Prisoners are evaluated for educational and substance abuse counseling needs by Sheriff's Counselors. Prisoners are assigned to a combination of PREP classes and SWAP work crews. Classes and counseling are conducted Monday through Friday, and work crews, primarily DPW street cleaning, are seven days a week. Prisoners referred by the courts in lieu of jail must participate two days a week. Prisoners transferred from jail, during the lst 60 days of their sentence, must participate five days a week, Monday through Friday. This program was authorized by PC 4024.2 and established 1981 (SWAP) and 1995 (PREP).

ELIGIBILITY

  • Referrals by sentencing court in lieu of jail (90 day sentence limit)
  • Jailed prisoners last 60 days of sentence.
  • $50.00 registration plus $3.00 per day. No fee if Monday-Friday participant.

COUNTY JAIL PROGRAMS

The Sheriff's Department provides an extensive general educational and testing program. When an individual is placed into custody, awaiting trial or after sentencing, he or she is tested to determine educational skills. The testing covers Writing, Social Studies, Mathematics, Literature, and Science. Based on their ability and offense, they are encouraged to participate in the various programs available.

GENERAL EDUCATION - ESTABLISHED 1992

For those individuals that have not graduated from High School or do not have a GED equivalent, a general education curriculum is available. On average, 450 inmates take one or more courses and 80% to 90% pass one or more subjects annually. Approximately 80 individuals passed the GED in 1998 and received their Certificate.

The Sheriff's Department has developed special programs for inmates that have been charged and convicted of specific crimes. These programs include the following:

S.I.S.T.E.R. (Sisters in Sober Treatment Empowered in Recovery) Program - Established 1992

This program provides educational and substance abuse counseling for women. The program is staffed by personnel from the Sheriff's Department. Walden House, Milpitas Adult Education, San Francisco City College, ARTS (Acupuncture Recovery Treatment Services) and Forensic Aids Project, as well as a number of volunteers and community based agencies.

The program is conducted at Jail #8. Activities commence at 7:30 a.m. and continue until 9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

ROADS (Road to Recovery) - Established 1994

The core components of Roads to Recovery are academics, substance abuse treatment, acupuncture, life skills, group and individual counseling, and a variety of specialized groups such as parenting and conflict resolution. Service providers include Milpitas Adult Education, Forensic Aids Project, and San Francisco City College, among others.

The program is provided for male inmates and is conducted at Jail #7. Activities commence at 6:00 a.m. and continue until 8:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.

R.S.V.P. (Resolve to Stop the Violence Project) - Established 1997

The program is based on the principles of Restorative Justice:

  • Crime is an offense against the community, not simply a violation against the state, and creates an obligation to make things right.
  • Victims have the right to be heard and to participate in the design and the operation of the program.
  • Offenders learn how to stop their violent behavior and are given the opportunity to understand, take responsibility for, and repair the harm they have done.

The program is provided for male inmates at Jail #7. Program activities are from 6:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m., Monday through Saturday. The program is staffed by counselors from Manalive. Substance abuse counseling is provided by counselors from Milestone.

PERSONAL SERVICE CONTRACTS

Agreements have been entered into with organizations and individuals to provide services that can assist in the rehabilitation of inmates.

NAME OF PROVIDER ANNUAL CONTRACT LIMIT

Acupuncture & Recovery Treatment Program

$124,512.00

Beatriz Calderon

33,280.00

Bianka Ramirez

50,000.00

Community Works

120,000.00

Don DeNevi

16,900.00

Garden Project

117,000.00

Health Advocates Coalition

14,820.00

Jean O'Hara

13,000.00

Joseph W. Green

33,000.00

Lazanius Johnson

50,000.00

Manalive Education & Research Institute

284,007.00

Martha Tietz

25,626.00

Northern California Services League

20,000.00

Prison Match

9,880.00

Reverend Billy Ware

20,000.00

Robert Soto

18,304.00

Tides Center for Promise4

4,743.00

SERVICES PROVIDED BY ABOVE LISTED ORGANIZATIONS

  • Acupuncture & Recovery Treatment Services - provide acupuncture detoxification and stress reduction for prisoners in the county jail.
  • Beatriz Calderon - Assist at prisoner programs by maintaining daily program attendance records and ongoing prisoner program file management, set up worksheet for program staff and prepare appropriate documentation to identify and address operational needs, as well as providing office management for program staff.
  • Bianka Ramirez - Coordinate victim restoration component of Sheriff's Resolve to Stop the Violence Project (R.S.V.P.); provide case management and other services for victims of R.S.V.P. participants.
  • Community Works - provide art programs, creative writing, and theater workshops to county jail and post release participants in the Sheriff's Resolve to Stop the violence Program (R.S.V.P.) And other jail programs; related documentation, publicity and evaluations, provide victim services for R.S.V.P.; provide parenting classes to women in the county jail; provide orientation classes to monolingual Spanish speaking prisoners.
  • Don DeNevi - provide reading, writing, and critical thinking classes to prisoners in the county jail using classics from American literature.
  • Garden Project - provide classes in horticulture, gardening, and green house techniques for prisoners in the county jail and related horticulture and tree planting services.
  • Health Advocates Coalition (Frederic Millen) - provide substance abuse classes for inmates at County Jail #2.
  • James Kevin Allen - provide advocacy and legal counseling for prisoners in the county jail.
  • Jean O'Hara - provide victim impact curriculum and classes for violent offenders in the Sheriff's Resolve to Stop the Violence Project (R.S.V.P.).
  • Joseph W. Green - provide counseling and job development to prisoners at the county jail and post-release sites.
  • Lazanius Johnson - provide inmate coordination and education for the Sheriff's Resolve to Stop the Violence Project (R.S.V.P.); facilitate transfer planning groups for participants being released from the program, coordinate referrals in the community.
  • Manalive Education and Research Institute - provide male-role re-education classes, training and administrative tasks deemed necessary for men addressing issues of violent behavior in both the county jail and at the Sheriff's Post-Release Educational Program (PREP).
  • Martha Tietz - maintain daily program attendance records and ongoing Prisoner Program file management, correspondence, and general administrative assistance.
  • Nicholas Gregaratos - assist in running legal libraries within the county jail, provide information on a broad range of issues, and represent inmates at department rule violation hearings.
  • Northern California Service League - provide Life Skills classes including relapse prevention, job readiness, and communications to prisoners in the county jail.
  • Prison Match - provide family and parent-child services for prisoners in the county jail.
  • Rev. Billy Ware - provide counseling for religious needs of prisoners in the county jail.
  • Robert Soto - provide relapse prevention courses and counseling to prisoners in the county jail to monolingual and bi-lingual Spanish speaking inmates.
  • Tides Center for Promise - provide educational classes and support groups for incarcerated women addressing issues of prostitution and ways to exit this lifestyle; provide post-release support groups and administrative follow up for county jail clients at their office.

ADDITIONAL SERVICE CONTRACT AGREEMENTS

NAME OF PROVIDER ANNUAL CONTRACT LIMIT

Center for Juvenile & Criminal Justice

$121,800.00

S.F. Institute for Criminal Justice

842,380.00

S.F. Pretrial Diversion Project

566,000.00

James Kevin Allen

46,000.00

Nicholas Gregaratos

15,600.00

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED BY CONTRACTOR

CENTER ON JUVENILE AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

  1. Interview and establish release plans for misdemeanors who do not quality for release under Sheriff's Citation protocol.
  2. Interview eligible custody, verify information, assess reliability, and evaluate criminal history.
  3. Supervise "cited out" defendants until their court appearances, accomplished through: reminder calls, office visits, or field verification through follow-up phone calls.
  4. Review housing cards routinely to determine if changes or circumstances have changed to enable some release mechanism previously ineligible for or denied.

    SAN FRANCISCO INSTITUTE FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

  5. Interview all persons arrested on non-warrant felony charges and on certain misdemeanor charges that are not citable by the Sheriff's Department who are booked into custody and are not immediately bailed or cited.
  6. Verify information collected from the interview to the extent possible.
  7. Compile data collected from interview, criminal records sheet, and the policy incident reports for review by the Municipal Court.
  8. Make advance court reminder telephone calls to all persons on O.R. whenever feasible.
  9. Assist the Court and Sheriff in implementing the O.R. program.
  10. Perform such other bail functions as the Court may require, but unless additional funds and resources are provided, not to exceed those furnished by the contractor during the fiscal year.
  11. Continue handling of probable cause at the request of the courts. The Contractor shall, to the extent possible, based on available funds, continue this service through fiscal year 98-99, but reserve the right to cease providing this service during the fiscal year if funding is not available.

    S.F. PRETRIAL DIVERSION PROJECT

    This provider has a broader range of duties, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

  12. Description of Services for Pretrial Diversion Project

    (a) Accept misdemeanor offenders referred by the Municipal Court for purpose of diverting them from the traditional criminal justice system.

    (b) Provide offenders assistance in the areas of vocational training, job placement, educational assistance, personal counseling, and or public service.

  13. Description of Service for Supervised Pretrial Release Project

    (a) Screen all referred defendants for placement into the Supervised Pretrial Release Project after referral from or Commissioner/Municipal Court. Contractor will address defendants with mental health and/or substance abuse problems, deal with homeless/indigent clients, and develop programs satisfactory to City which focus on special situational circumstances. Contractor will comply with the requirements and standards for the supervised Pretrial Release Project in existence on the date of this agreement, as such requirements and standards may, from time to time, be modified or supplemented with the prior approval or at the direction of the City.

  14. Description of Services for Mentor Court Project

    (a) Operation of Mentor Court Program

    Contractor shall operate a Mentor Court program (the "MC Program") consisting of a rigorous educational development program into which certain youthful narcotics offenders will be diverted in lieu of formal criminal prosecution. Contractor shall carry out all directions of the Court and of City relating to the MC Program.

    (b) Intake Process

    The San Francisco District Attorney's (the "DA's Office") shall determine which individual case shall be referred for possible participation in the MC Program. Such determination shall be made in accordance with eligibility guidelines approved by the Court.

  15. Particular Reporting Requirements

    (a) Without limiting the scope of the general reporting requirements contained in this Agreement, Contractor shall, as directed by the court, promptly provide regular status reports regarding each participant.

  16. General Program Standards

    (a) Without limiting the scope of the foregoing, Contractor shall operate the MC Program in accordance with the requirements and standards for the MC Program in existence on the date of this Agreement, as such requirements and standards may, from time to time, be modified or supplemented with prior approval or at the direction of the Court or City.

    SHERIFF'S INMATE WELFARE FUND

    Operation of the Inmate Welfare Fund is regulated by Sections 4025 and 4026 of the California Penal Code and the California Administrative Code, Title 15, Section 1043.

    The 1993-1994 Civil Grand Jury found several areas where the Sheriff's Department was not in compliance with the laws and regulations set forth. Following the Grand Jury Report, the Sheriff's Department took the necessary action to correct the had existed.

    Currently, the Sheriff's Department has in its Policy and Procedures Manual, Section F-01, which outlines the practices to be followed with regard to the Inmate Welfare Fund.

    PRISONER CASH ACCOUNTS

    The Policy and Procedures Manual provides in Section F-09 for the establishment, maintenance, and disposition of prisoner's money while the prisoner is in custody of the San Francisco Sheriff's Department. A review of policies and procedures set forth in Section F-09 appears to be followed as stated.

    COMMISSARY

    A commissary store is maintained for prisoners that permits their use of personal funds for the purchase of approved items in order to enhance prisoners' morale and augment items available through the facility. Policy and Procedure used to regulated this operation is contained in Section F-10 in the Procedures Manual.

    Profits from the commissary are turned over to the Inmate Welfare Fund. The following pages contain a copy of Income and Expenses for the Inmate Welfare Fund for the period from July 1, 1997, through June 30, 1998.

    INMATE WELFARE FUND

    1997-1998

    JULY 1, 1997 - JUNE 30, 1998

    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1998

    Balance Forwarded Into 1997-1998 Fiscal Year

    General Inmate Welfare Fund $408,082

    Capital Improvement Inmate Welfare Fund 189,306

    Total Balance Forwarded Into 1997 - 1998 Fiscal Year $597,388

    Revenue 7/1/97 - 6/30/98

    General Inmate Welfare Fund $672,340

    Capital Improvement Welfare Fund 45,038

    Total Revenue 717,378

    Available Funds by Sub-program

    General Inmate Welfare Fund $1,080,422

    Capital Improvement Welfare Fund 234,344

    Total Funds Available $1,314,766

    General Inmate Welfare Fund $1,080,422

    Available from above

    Expenditures 7/1/97 - 6/30/98

    Other Professional Services $494,196

    Other Supplies 113,326

    Permanent Salaries 34,818

    Payments to other governments 22,352

    Subscriptions 22,264

    Legal Services 15,370

    Other Equipment Maintenance 7,419

    Fringe Benefit 6,327

    Minor Furnishings 6,094

    Postage 2,979

    Other Services 2,616

    Overtime 2,457

    Food 2,386

    Other Equipment Maintenance Supplies 2,286

    Data Processing Supplies 1,915

    Recreation and Athletic Supplies 1,553

    Copy Machine 1,287

    Travel 1,172

    Small Tools & Instruments 1,019

    Other Building Maintenance Supplies 989

    Agricultural Supplies 784

    Painters Supplies 460

    Training 420

    Other Safety Supplies 330

    Plumbing Supplies 199

    Other Construction Supplies 198

    Office Supplies 125

    Electrical Supplies 119

    Office Equipment Maintenance 115

    Communications Supplies 53

    Membership Fees 50

    Hardware 29

    Fuels & Lubricants 27

    Auto Mileage 18

    Vehicle Parts & Supplies 3

    Total Expenditures $745,755

    Unexpected balance General Inmate Welfare Fund 6/30/98 $334,667

    INMATE WELFARE FUND

    1997-1998

    JULY 1, 1997 - JUNE 30, 1998

    AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1998

     

    Unexpended balance General Inmate Welfare Fund 6/30/98 $334,667

    Encumbrances open on 6/30/98

    Other Professional Services $76,810

    Other Supplies 16,291

    Total Encumbrances open on 6/30/98 93,101

    Unencumbered balance General Welfare Fund 6/30/98 $241,566

    Capital Improvement Inmate Welfare Fund

    Available on previous page $234,344

    Expenditures 7/1/97 - 6/30/98

    Dept. Of Public Works - Construction Management $1,631

    Total Expenditures 1,631

    Unexpended balance Capital Improvement Inmate Welfare Fund 6/30/98 $232,713

    Total Encumbrances open on 6/30/98 0

    Unencumbered balance Capital Improvement Inmate Welfare Fund $232,713

    Total Unencumbered Balance $474,279

    SHERIFF'S BUREAU OF BUILDING SERVICES

    The San Francisco Sheriff's Department established the "Sheriff's Bureau of Building Services" in 1995 in an attempt to provide better maintenance and repair services for the buildings and property under the direct control of the Sheriff. These premises include the following locations:

    Jails 8 & 9, 425 Seventh Street, San Francisco

    Programs Building, 930 Bryant Street, San Francisco

    Treasure Island Brig, Shop, and Building 217, Treasure Island

    Jails 3 & 7, 1 Moreland Drive, San Bruno

    The current and additional engineering and maintenance staff requested for the fiscal year 1999/2000 is shown on the next page.

     

    New Sheriff's Facility/Treasure Island Brig/Programs Building

     

     

    1

    San Francisco Location - Includes Sheriff's Facility (County Jails #8 & #9), Programs Facility (930 Bryant Street) and Treasure Island Buildings (Brig, Shop, and Building 217)

     

     

     

     

     

    Current Permanent Staffing Level

     

     

    Current staffing coverage = Monday - Friday Day Shift

     

    7335

    Senior Stationary Engineer

    2

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (Maintenance & Repair - Day Shift)

    2

    7334

    "As-Needed" Stationary Engineer

    0.5

     

    Total Current Engineering Personnel

    4.5

     

     

     

     

    Requested Additional Permanent Engineering Positions

     

    7120

    Building & Grounds Superintendent

    1

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (Maintenance & Repair - Day Shift)

    3

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (M&R Swing & Graveyard)

    4

     

    Subtotal Requested Additional Engineering Personnel

    8

     

     

     

     

    Proposed Total Number of Positions

    12.5

    2

    County Jail #3/#7/Learning Center Complex - Includes County Jails #3, #7, the Learning Center, 150 Acres of Grounds, Water Pumping Station, Sewer Pumping Station, Water Tank)

     

     

    Current staffing coverage = 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., 7 days per week, overlapped with a swing shift (1 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.) 5 days per week

     

     

    Current Permanent Engineering Positions

     

    7120

    Buildings & Grounds Maintenance Superintendent

    1

    7335

    Senior Stationary Engineer

    1

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (Maintenance & Repair - Day Shift)

    3

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (Maintenance & Repair - Swing Shift)

    1

    7334

    "As-Needed" Stationary Engineer

    0.5

     

    Total Current Engineering Personnel

    6.5

     

     

     

    2

    County Jail #3/#7/Learning Center Complex - Includes County Jails #3, #7, the Learning Center, 150 Acres of Grounds, Water Pumping Station, Sewer Pumping Station, Water Tank) Continued

     

     

    Current staffing coverage = 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., 7 days per week, overlapped with a swing shift (1 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.) 5 days per week

     

     

    Requested Additional Permanent Engineering Position

     

    7335

    Senior Stationary Engineer

    1

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (Maintenance & Repair - Day Shift)

    4

    7334

    Stationary Engineer (M&R Swing 7 Graveyard)

    3

     

    Subtotal Requested Additional Engineering Personnel

    8

     

     

     

     

    Proposed Total Number of Positions

    14.5

    With adequate staffing, the Sheriff's Bureau of Building Services could perform many of the repairs that are urgently needed. The work that can be done by the Sheriff's Bureau of Building Services will expedite the repairs and result in substantial savings.

    One such example would be the repair of the window at County Jail #3. In the past the DPW/BBR came and repaired the cell windows at County Jail #3 by manufacturing and installing security screens over the cell windows, opening up the cell window frames and making the window mechanisms operational, and by installing new glass in the broken windows. They have spent over half a million dollars on these windows over the last several years (over $80,000 per tier half), and the end result is that not all the windows have yet been repaired, the prisoners have broken most of the mechanisms and then broke out several window panes. Rather than spend another half a million dollars, the Sheriff's Department staff is installing security screens and Plexiglas at a cost of less than $50,000 for the entire building.

    SUMMARY "SBBS" WORK ORDERS

    A computer program that generates work orders for ongoing routine maintenance for buildings and equipment and that keeps track of "user" repair request work orders is in use by the SBBS. A report was requested and received from the Sheriff's Bureau of Building Services, detailing the number and type of work performed. Following is a summary of that report.

  17. County Jails #8, #9, and Treasure Island Brig

    There were 10,697 work orders requested for the twelve months period from

    January 1, 1998, to January 1, 1999. Approximately 8,500 were preventative and

    predictable maintenance tasks. The remaining 2,197 work orders were "user" repair requests. The backlog at that time was 103 requests.

  18. Records for the San Mateo site (County Jail #3 and #7 Learning Center) for the last twelve month period from May 1, 1998, to May 1, 1999, indicates there were approximately 3,466 work order requests entered into the computer. Of this total, 2060 were computer-generated preventative and predictable maintenance tasks, while 1406 were "user" repair requests. The backlog at that time was 1,137 requests.

    There will always be a need for the Sheriff's Department to use the resources of other City and County departments, primarily the Department of Public Works, Bureau of Building Repair, Bureau of Construction Management (SAR), and Bureau of Architecture and Engineering, and Water Department, as well as private contractors and consultants.

    INTERDEPARTMENTAL WORK ORDERS

    The Sheriff's Department, as with most City and County agencies, is required to have work performed by or through the Department of Public Works. The procedure requires the agency (Sheriff's Department) to prepare an "Interdepartmental Work Order" form specifying the work to be performed. This form is then sent to the Department of Public Works or other authorized agency for an estimate. The estimate, when completed, is returned to the Sheriff's Department for approval of the "Work Order" form. This form usually provides a description of the work to be performed and, in some cases, the estimated time to complete the work. The actual start and completion date is not usually specified. There is no breakdown as to how the labor and material costs were determined. If approved, the Sheriff's Department requests a transfer of funds to the Department of Public Works or other authorized agency. These funds must be advanced before any work is started.

    STAFFING

    As of December 2, 1998, the sworn staff members of the Sheriff's Department, in addition to Sheriff Michael Hennessey, consisted of the following:

    3 Chief Deputy Sheriffs

    4 Sheriff's Captains

    5 Sheriff's Lieutenants

    6 Sheriff's Sergeants

    7 Senior Deputy Sheriffs

    8 Deputy Sheriffs (includes 6 Deputy Sheriff grant positions)

    There are 783 sworn positions and 118.5 civilian positions, for a total of 901.5 budgeted positions. The breakdown of sworn staff by facility and section, as of October 1998, is as follows:

    SWORN STAFFING

    DIV/FAC AUTH CURRENT PERCENT

    ADMINISTRATION AND COURT SERVICES DIVISION

    Chief Deputy 1 1 100%

    Administration 8 8

    Personnel 3 2 66%

    Budget 3 2 66%

    Training 6 42

    Backgrounds 6 6 100%

    Investigations 6 6 100%

    Civil 15 11 73%

    Courts 82 64 78%

    SBBS 3 3 100%

    CUSTODY DIVISION

    Chief Deputy & 1 2 2 100%

    CJ #1 76 68 89%

    CJ #2 81 75 92%

    CJ #3 92 79 85%

    CJ #7 63 55 87%

    CJ #8 102 87 85%

    CJ #9 78 69 88%

    SFGH 21 18 85%

    Classification 20 19 95%

    FIELD AND SUPPORT SERVICES

    Chief Deputy 1 1 100%

    Station Transfer Unit 38 (Includes 3 Grant Positions) 32 84%

    CWB 10 10 100%

    Transportation 12 9 75%

    Technical Services 5 5 83%

    Treasure Island 22 1 9%

    JAIL ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS DIVISION

    SWAP/CP/WSU 16 (Includes 2 Grant Positions) 14

    TOTAL 773

    Recently the Sheriff's Department has been given permission to administer testing for sworn positions of Deputy Sheriff.

    A request was made for a breakdown of length of service for sworn personnel. We were informed that the Department is currently working on a comprehensive Personnel software package which will make this sort of information more readily available. A review of 750 currently employed sworn personnel was made and showed the following:

    0 to 5 years service

    373 (50%)

    5 to 10 years service

    138 (18%)

    10 to 15 years service

    89 (12%)

    15 to 20 years service

    58 (8%)

    More than 20 years service

    92 (12%)

    TRAINING

    The current training space is limited and is used primarily for ongoing training. The facility is located at 555 7th Street, San Francisco and consists of one classroom. Additional facilities are needed 3 or 4 times a year for training new officers. Currently, two classrooms are rented from the San Francisco Fire Department at the Fire Training Center on Treasure Island.

    It is anticipated that the Sheriff's Department will acquire some space in the Training Center on Treasure Island, as a permanent facility in the near future.

    INSPECTIONS REPORTS FROM CITY AND STATE AGENCIES

    Members of the Civil Grand Jury toured all the jail facilities under the jurisdiction of the City and County of San Francisco. Of particular concern was Jail #3, located in San Bruno. Although the sworn staff, maintenance crews, and inmates make a sincere effort to keep the facility clean and in an acceptable state of repair, the structure has deteriorated to the extent that it is not possible.

    The physical condition of the building was distressing to the members of the Grand Jury. It was agreed that immediate action must be taken to replace this structure for the health and safety of not only the inmates but also the Sheriff's Department personnel. Reports were requested and received from the following state and city agencies, charged with making such reports:

  19. Board of Corrections (BOC) - Biennial Inspection - Penal Code Section 6031
  20. State of California Fire Marshal
  21. City and County of San Francisco, Department of Building Inspection
  22. Department of Public Health

    Reports were prepared and sent to the Sheriff's Department for review and to take necessary action.

    On June 4, 1999, a meeting to review and discuss the findings by the City and State inspections was held with Sheriff Hennessey and the jail facility commanders.

    Commanders were given the opportunity to respond to each item and indicate the status of the comment. It is noted that a substantial number of items requiring action have been corrected. The remaining items, that need further attention, will be corrected as soon as possible and the inspecting agency so advised.

    Nutritional Evaluation and Medical/Mental Health Evaluation inspections found "ALL JAILS" to be in compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations. No corrective action is required.

    SUMMARY OF REPORTS

     

    Board of Corrections, State of California

    Biennial Inspection - Penal Code Section 6031

     

    An inspection was made of the Sheriff's facilities in the San Francisco County jail system on December 8-10, 1998.

    The facilities were inspected for compliance with the Minimum Standards for Local Detention Facilities, as outlined in Titles 15 and 24, California Code of Regulations (CCR). The inspection consisted of a "walk-through" of each physical plant and a review of policies and procedures governing the operation of each facility.

  23. Fire Inspection Clearance

    In coordination with local authorities, the State Fire Marshal is required to conduct annual fire inspections of all jails (sections 1314 and 13146.1) of the Health and Safety Code). The details of the Fire Marshals Report will be found under that title.

  24. Health Inspections

    All facilities have current, required health inspections (Health and Safety Code Section 101045). These inspections include evaluation of environmental, nutritional, and medical-mental health requirements. The Department of Health report will be summarized under that title.

  25. Other Issues

    (a) Staffing

    The staffing appears to be one of the major challenges facing the detention facilities. The inspection identifies all facilities as being out of compliance with staffing requirements. This, according to the inspection, has been a growing problem and now appears critical.

    It was estimated that nearly 400 of approximately 550 custodial staff positions had been filled since 1994. Recruitment has reportedly also not kept pace with attrition. Staff is optimistic that the recent hiring of a personnel analyst for the Sheriff's Department will enable them to maintain an open recruitment for staff and keep hiring lists current.

    (b) Crowding

    Crowding was not as critical an issue for this system as it has been in previous inspections, but is still a factor with which the department must reckon. Facilities populations were generally near Board Rated Capacities (BRC).

    (c) Pilot Projects

    The Board approved pilot projects for raised toilet areas and temporary restraining devices in the safety cells, and inmate-activated emergency cell buttons in County Jail #8 and County Jail #9.

    Based on county reports, the "BOC" reviewed these projects in 1997-98, with consideration for transitioning to a more permanent Alternate Means of Compliance (AMC). The "BOC" did not approve the temporary restraining devices in the safety cells in either facility, nor did it approve continuing the raised toilets in County Jail #8 cells. The temporary restraining devices need to be "padded over" and the raised toilets removed from County Jail #8 for the safety cells to be in compliance with regulations. The County received an "AMC" for the inmate-activated emergency cell buttons.

    (d) Policy and Procedures

    During the mid-1990's there were significant improvements in facility and division manuals for custody, medical, and mental health services. Medical and mental health manuals were referenced, but not reviewed during this inspection, but according to the BOC, they appear to be well maintained.

    The inspection continued to emphasize review of detox, safety cell and restraint document logs with custody and health care staff. These areas require coordinated monitoring among custody and health care staff and the department has invested considerable time and effort in implementing policies that are appropriate to the system and consistent with Title 15.

    (e) Grievance Procedure

    The system is in compliance with grievance procedures. It is recommended that facility managers review policies and implementation practices for opportunities to simplify them.

    Fire Marshal, State of California

    On November 23, 1998, a fire and life safety inspection was conducted, as required by sections 13145 and 13146.1 of the Health and Safety Code. The Inspection was made of Jail #3 and #7, both located at #1 Moreland Drive, San Bruno, California. The Report was sent to Sheriff Hennessey January 29, 1999.

    A summary of the report is as follows:

    Jail #3

  26. In the dorms, combustible containers are being used. Replace with the approved type.
  27. The following fire extinguishers need to be mounted: Fire extinguisher in the Boiler Room, Laundry, Garage Storeroom (3), Fan Room, and Kitchen Food Storage.
  28. The following fire extinguishers need to be serviced or replaced: Fire extinguisher in hose cabinet in kitchen-west wall, Educational Wing Classroom #4, Engineer's Shop, Laundry, Classifications Office, Garage Storeroom.
  29. There are no plans in sight (if at all) for the remodeling of the Engineer's Shop and the Storeroom across from the Engineer's Shop. The walls have 1/2 inch gypsum board on one side of the wall only.
  30. In the dorms, there are plastic shower curtains. It is not known if they meet the maximum flame-spread class. Provide the flame-spread class for the plastic shower curtains or remove them from the facility.
  31. The emergency generator could not be tested. It was unknown how to transfer power. The facility needs to find out the procedure for testing the generator and post it at the generator.
  32. The following areas do not meet the type of construction permitted for this facility: 4 South, 4 North, 3 South, 3 North. The walls are damaged and wood is exposed. Repair shall be made.
  33. The following areas have unprotected penetrations that need to be repaired: 6th floor South above the fire doors, 6th floor North above the fire doors, 5th floor South above the fire doors, 2 South by smoke barriers, above Print Shop. The basement has numerous unprotected penetrations.
  34. There is not waterflow alarm on the system. Install waterflow alarm as required.
  35. No local waterflow alarm (tamper) is installed on the sprinkler system. Install local waterflow alarm as required.
  36. Fire department connection caps are missing. Install caps on the fire department connections as required.
  37. Holding cells medical infirmary has a painted sprinkler head. Replace painted sprinkler head.

    Jail #7

  38. Large paintings in exit need proof of flame retardancy or treatment.
  39. The Southeast stairwell has mattresses stored under the stairs. Remove mattresses.
  40. Space heaters without proper safety devices are in use in the following rooms: 230, 211 (2 in use), CJ Med 7 Nurses Station. Remove existing space heaters or replace with ones that have tip-over kill switches and temperature controlled shut-down thermostats.
  41. Throughout both jails and the learning center combustible containers are being used. Replace existing waste containers with approved type.
  42. The following fire extinguishers need to be mounted: Fire extinguisher in Control Room and fire extinguisher in Fire Alarm Control Room.
  43. Two fire extinguishers by Computer Classroom 103 are past due for service (Learning Center). Have fire extinguishers serviced or replaced.
  44. Sprinkler system:

    (a) Sprinkler heads in the Sally Port area need cleaning.

    (b) In the Library, sprinkler head is obstructed. Move objects so that they are no closer than 18 inches from the sprinkler head deflector.

  45. The facility has white resin chairs in use throughout the facility. It is not known if they meet the maximum flame-spread class. Provide the flame-spread class for the white resin chairs or remove them from the facility.
  46. The dorms have separation curtains that have no flame-spread class indicated on them. Facility needs to prove the flame-spread class for these curtains.
  47. The following doors did not close and latch with the self-closing device: Room 225; Officer's Dining, Room 217; Room 216. Maintain the doors as self closing.
  48. In the following areas, the fireproofing has been worn away:

    (a) C Dorm: fireproofing missing above dorm Deputy Station.

    (b) F Dorm: fireproofing missing above dorm Deputy Station.

    Department of Building Inspection

    The Department of Building Inspection conducted an inspection of the jails under the jurisdiction of the City and County of San Francisco. Deficiencies and corrective action to be taken is as follows:

    Jail #1 (6th floor) and Jail #2 (7th floor), Hall of Justice, 850 Bryant Street

    Inspection made April 20, 1999

     

  49. Install permanent Evacuation Signs at all exit doors leading to the stairways at 6th and 7th floor. Temporary Evacuation Signs should be posted in the interim.
  50. Provide EXIT signs above the exit doors indicating exit path from the Kitchen at the 7th floor.
  51. In the 7th floor corridor, the fire door closed improperly without latching due to the paint and the tape binding the hinges.
  52. Replace missing door self-closer at the corridor fire door to the Dentist Office.
  53. Require Stairway Identification Signs at each floor level of all enclosed stairways. (Copy of Section 1006.16 San Francisco Building Code and ID Sign Diagram attached)
  54. Need illuminated exit signs at all exit doors to the stairways and at the corridors with or without arrow indicating direction of the pathway to the exit door.
  55. Faire caulk holes and pipe penetration through the fire-rated corridors and stairways.
  56. At the 7th floor Gymnasium, relocate the fire sprinklers blocked by the steel beams on each side from the underside of the roof to the underside of the steel beams for proper fire extinguishing system.
  57. Repair the leaking pipe in mechanical closet CW 21 at 6th floor.
  58. At 6th and 7th floors of Jail 1 and 2, the staff rooms, corridors, and inmate cells lack fire-extinguishing systems. A partial fire sprinklers system was installed in several locations such as the Gymnasium, Medical Examination Room, Pharmaceutical Storage Room, and Training Room.
  59. Install exhaust fan in the laundry closet at the 6th floor.
  60. The clothes dryer exhaust shall be connected with ducts extending to exterior wall or roof. The vent outlet shall also have draft damper.
  61. Replace the burned-out lamp in the illuminated EXIT sign at 7th floor.

    Jails #3 and #7, San Bruno

    Inspection Made May 12, 1999

  62. Install permanent Evacuation Signs at all exit doors leading to the stairway and to the public way. Temporary Evacuation Signs should be posted in the interim.
  63. Need EXIT signs above the exit doors indicating exit path from the Kitchen at the Jail #3.
  64. Install security door with remote control door release and remove the padlock at the Kitchen exit door.
  65. Relocate the plant behind the exit door of the Dining Room.
  66. Require Stairway Identification Signs at each floor level of all enclosed stairways. (Copy of Section 1006.16 San Francisco Building Code and ID Sign Diagram attached.)
  67. Need illuminated exit signs at all exit doors to the stairways and at the corridors with or without arrow indicating direction of the pathway to the exit door.
  68. Provide proper signage and parking and loading zone striping with international wheelchair symbol for the accessible parking space. (Diagram attached)
  69. Remove the locker and metal frame from the closet in Jail #7.
  70. Place label on door of the closet with fire sprinkler inspection test valve.
  71. In Jail #7, the Women and Men accessible bathrooms lack the international symbol for restroom identification and ADA permanent Room ID Signage. (See the attached diagram.)
  72. Lower the first aid cabinet and breathing apparatus cabinet to 27" above the floor.
  73. Adjust door self-closer to close properly with latching at Jail #7 Medical Office.
  74. Each Dormitory shall have 64 inmates maximum to comply with Section 470A.2.8 San Francisco Building Code. There were 50 single beds and 12 double beds at Dorm "A" exceeding the maximum 64 allowable inmates. Remove the 5 excess double beds.
  75. Remove book case and file cabinets blocking the exit corridor.
  76. Corridor fire door shall be maintained self-closing. Remove door rubber stop preventing the fire door to be self-closing in Jail #7
  77. Install door self-closer at the corridor doors and door to the Maintenance Shop.

    Jails #8 and #9, 425 - 7th Street

    Inspection Made May 18, 1999

  78. Install permanent Evacuation Signs at all exit doors leading to the stairway and to the public way. Temporary Evacuation Signs should be posted in the interim.
  79. Reset door self-closer at all fire doors to the medical treatment rooms and holding cells.
  80. Remove the rubber door stops preventing the fire doors to be self-closing.
  81. Patch the hold in wall above the counter facing the holding cells.
  82. Provide floor door stop and replace missing wall tiles at the Lobby bathroom.
  83. Relocate book cases, file cabinets, chairs, tables, plastic trays, and wall ornaments from the fire-rated corridor. The Exit corridor shall be maintained clear and unobstructed.
  84. Require Stairway Identification Signs at each floor level of all enclosed stairway. (Copy of Section 1006.16 San Francisco Building Code and ID Sign Diagram attached)
  85. Provide proper signage and parking and loading zone striping with international wheelchair symbol for the accessible parking space. (Diagram attached)
  86. Place label on door of the accessible bathroom with fire hose cabinet.
  87. The women and men accessible bathrooms lack the international symbol for restroom identification and ADA permanent Room ID Signage. (See the attached diagram.)
  88. Lower the fire extinguisher cabinet and breathing apparatus cabinet to 27" above floor.
  89. Provide labels to storage rooms, janitorial rooms, and electrical rooms.
  90. At 5th floor Jail, replace the damaged corridor fire door and repair the leaking faucet in the accessible Men's Bathroom.
  91. Remount the fire extinguisher at 48 inches maximum above the floor.
  92. Fire caulk the conduits through electrical room fire wall and ceiling.
  93. Interior stairways to the Control Center in the Pods shall have 2" wide contrasting strips at the top and bottom step.
  94. Paper signs shall be replaced with permanent signs.
  95. Need metal pan under the grease trap overflow.
  96. Replace plastic bucket with metal pan under the air diffuser.
  97. Remove the peel-off old paint from the wall and ceiling and repaint the surfaces.
  98. Remove plastic garbage can and bookcase in the accessible bathroom.
  99. Mount fire extinguisher on wall in the generator room.
  100. Repair loose vehicle detector at the entrance room.
  101. Construct a noncombustible landing, stairway, and guardrails from the exit door onto the roof.
  102. Remove plans file, boxes, and cabinet blocking access the top floor accessible bathroom.

    Department of Public Health

    The Department of Public Health conducted inspections of "ALL CITY AND COUNTY JAIL FACILITIES," including 'COURT HOLDING CELLS." These inspections took place during February 1999. The inspections covered the following:

  103. Environmental Health (ENV-HEALTH)
  104. Nutritional Evaluation
  105. Medical/Mental Health Evaluation

Jail #1 - Environmental Health

(7) Shortage of sheets, towels, tee shirts reported.

(12) Shortages of sheets and towels reported

(15) Staff complains that hot water is not hot enough.

(17) Men's classification area stuffy and dusty. Ventilation duct work may need cleaning throughout County Jail #1.

(19) Several overhead lights need repair in the men's classification area.

(20) - TB Screening Area not clean, no hand soap or towels

  • Women's side Dorm gate will not lock.
  • Only one "good" key for safety Cell #1 (Women's side)
  • Women's Dorm Area - A window crank has been broken for one month. Window is open and inmates are cold.
  • Visiting Room telephone handsets are cracked and deteriorated and no longer easily cleanable.

(21) - (Women's side) Clothes dryer must be vented to the outside air, and lint accumulation is to be removed regularly. (From 1998, 1997)

  • Provide laundry detergent so clothes don't have to be washed in hand soap (Women's side)
  • Discontinue Durashine floor wax use in this jail (from 1998) (Women's side)
  • All Jails: Adequate staffing must be maintained for safety of inmates and staff (from 1998 report). One facility is at 76% of authorized staffing levels. One facility has two new classrooms but only one can be used due to inadequate staffing levels.

Jail #2 - Environmental Health

(7) Shortage of women's clothing reported.

(12) Shortages of sheets and towels reported.

(16) Gym skylight has small rain leak.

(17) Improved, comfortable temperatures were being maintained at time of inspections. Main holding tanks get far less use now that County Jail #9 is open.

(20) - One washing machine is out of order.

  • Visiting Room telephone handsets are cracked and deteriorated and no longer easily cleanable.

Jail #2 - California Uniform Retail Food Facilities Law

(9) Pharmacy staff reports two recent waste water backups into their offices. The water

contained food particles which implicates the Kitchen, in particular, the mop sink which does not have a screen over the drain. A screen needs to be installed and procedures initiated to prevent large particles of food from getting into drains.

It is suggested that the floor drains in the Pharmacy office be capped if possible.

(10) - A new steamer has been installed under a vent hood, eliminating the safety hazard and improving the indoor air quality.

  • Flues are being cleaned every 6 months.

Jail #3 - Environmental Health

(2) Improper defrosting and handling potentially hazardous foods; inadequate hand washing facilities.

(5) Shortage of work boots for kitchen workers.

(6) Clothing Exchange Log Book is incomplete. Unable to verify that mandatory changes are being made.

(7) Shortage of sweatshirts, towels, underwear.

(13) Unable to verify, due to insufficient record keeping, that washable items such as sheets, mattress covers and towels are exchanged at least once each week.

(15) - Yard toilets are filthy. Deteriorated enclosure is a safety hazard with rusted metal, crumbling mortar.

  • Shower enclosures on all tiers are rotted through. Plaster is crumbling on exterior surfaces.
  • Toilet bowls, wash basins, drinking fountains, and showers are not clean.

(16) - Drips and leaks, peeling paint, and plastic sheeting over windows noted in several cells and dorms, also in Pill Room, medical area.

  • Window replacement is in progress but not complete.
  • Broken and missing glass in dorm toilet rooms.
  • Kitchen window screens contain rubbish.

(17) Improved, comfortable temperatures were being maintained at time of inspection. Main holding tanks get far less use now that County Jail #9 is open.

(20) - Sanitation, Safety, and Maintenance Policy and Procedures need to be updated.

  • Replace insulation around steam pipes in 2N and elsewhere if deteriorated. Repair urinal in 2N.
  • One washing machine out of order.

(22) Continuing mouse problem in food storage areas.

Jail # 3 - California Uniform Retail Food Facilities Law

(1) Repair broken floor tiles and reseal the floor.

(3) - Mouse droppings were observed in food storage area near loading dock as on previous inspections.

  • There are no fly screens on kitchen windows. Many windows are broken and contain garbage, refuse, kitchen trays, etc., between the window frame and the security screens outside.

(4) - Provide additional lighting by replacing existing light bulbs with newer, brighter ones in each fixture (Same as 1998)

  • Replace broken light covers in meat room and provide covers or sleeves for all lights. (Same as 1998 report)

(7) Toilet room for inmate workers has no door or fly screens.

(8) - Hand sink was vandalized and never replaced.

  • In the produce prep room and the meat cutting room there were no hand soap and towels available. No signs.

(10) - Two years ago it was noted that the cutting board in the produce prep room was not longer cleanable and should be removed. This table-size board is still in use.

  • The ice machine is in very poor sanitary condition and the door needs repair or replacement.
  • The dishwasher was out of order at the time of inspection.
  • A complete set of grease filters is required for the vent hood.
  • Hot water steamer leaks scalding water from many seams and is a safety hazard to everyone working there.

(11) The dishwasher was out of order at the time of inspection.

(16) - State and Federal codes now require cold foods to be kept at or below 41F.

  • (Meat Cutting Room) Chicken breasts were being "defrosted" in a sink full of stagnant, warm tap water (67-71F)
  • Freshly roasted turkey (sliced) was at 68F.
  • Cold cuts were at 58F.
  • Raw chicken thighs were at 67F.

(19) Steam table on serving line not repaired (1998 report).

(26) - One hand sink and soap dispensers were vandalized and never replaced.

  • In the produce prep room and the meat cutting room there were not hand soap or paper towels available. No signs.

Jail #7 - Environment Health

(7) Shortage of everything reported.

(15) - Education corridor water fountain not draining and not clean and does not have adequate water pressure.

  • Education corridor janitor closet mop sink contains muddy standing water. Floor and walls very dirty.
  • Leak between this closet and the adjacent Classroom "C" has not been repaired.

(16) - Rain leaks into front exterior corridors.

  • Janitor closet next to Classroom "C" needs to be sealed to prevent further water damage to classroom.

(17) - Dust accumulated on ventilation grillwork in dorms. A lift is required to reach grills and light fixtures. There is no lift on sight, it must be borrowed from 850 Bryant.

  • Ventilation noticeably inadequate throughout.

(21) - For the safety of inmates and staff, installation of a secure, enclosed walkway between the main building and the education building (as now exists between jails 3 and 7) is strongly recommended.

  • All facilities except County Jail #8: All need to obtain updated MSDS for each chemical in use, and keep this information in an accessible location.

Jail #8 - Environmental Health

(2) Improperly cleaning, sanitizing, and drying serving trays (Same as 1998)

(6) There is a schedule, but there is not way to verify the mandated changes in other-garments, because no record is being kept. Same comment for undergarments.

(13) Unable to verify, due to insufficient record keeping, that washable items such as sheets, mattress covers, and towels are exchanged at least once each week.

(15) Showers, sinks, and restroom walls and floors remain unsatisfactory, structurally and operationally. Paint is peeling and floor covering has become loose.

(16) - Replacement of substandard concrete work has not taken place.

  • Restroom walls and flooring show rapid deterioration in this new facility, due to lack of ventilation.

(17) there is a noticeable stuffiness throughout, and excessive humidity in toilet/shower rooms causing paint and flooring deterioration and mold growth. Staff reports dissatisfaction, especially in medical suites. A professional assessment/adjustment is needed.

(19) This facility should be checked for adequate lighting at desk level.

(22) Housekeeping not satisfactory.

Jail #8 - California Uniform Retail Food Facilities Law

(1) Medical offices below kitchen report some recent leaks.

(8) Hand sink in dish room had not soap or towels and was covered by dirty utensils.

(9) Several dripping faucets seen in the kitchen and pantries. They require a lot of force to fully shut off the water.

(10) - Serving trays are not being adequately cleaned or sanitized or properly dried.

  • Ice scoop is being improperly stored inside the ice maker. It appears that the external scoop holder is not the right size and needs to be changed.

(11) - Dishwasher temperature gauges are very difficult to read because of a buildup of grease. They also are difficult to clean. It is recommended that desired temperatures be marked on the surrounding dial as a visual aid in determining proper functioning of the machine.

  • Wash temperature was below the required 140F.
  • Rinse temperature must be above 180F to sanitize and promote the quick air drying of the trays. Rinse temperatures not adequate (as in 1998).
  • Improper stacking of dirty, wet trays is still being practiced, as in 1998. These unsafe practices continue to present an unacceptable risk for the transmission of disease. Better supervision and additional training of kitchen staff is needed.
  • It is again recommended that proper dishwasher functioning and operation, and the cleanliness and proper air drying of trays be part of the weekly self-inspection performed by staff of the Sheriff's Department.
  • As in 1998, additional dishwasher racks or other drying racks must be available to allow for the required air drying of serving trays before they are stacked.

(16) Staff Dining Room, milk refrigerator was at 48F.

(19) Staff Dining Room, food on steam table is at 115F.

Jail #9 - Environmental Health

(21) Safety Cell #2: Emergency call light not working.

Court Holding Cells, 850 Bryant Street

(6) - Vinyl-clad fixtures are deteriorated and difficult to clean.

  • Water faucet overshoots basin.

(7) - Toilet in Tank 25 particularly dirty.

  • Walls are disfigured with graffiti and paint is peeling.
  • Complete and proper repainting of holding cells should take place annually.

(8) Ventilation continues to be poor, 30 or more persons may be held in a loft by 25ft cell which is stuffy even when empty.

(11) Crowding, poor ventilation and minimal monitoring (no audio or camera) combine to create a potentially unsafe environment.

(12) Housekeeping is only marginal.

TREASURE ISLAND (NAVY BRIG)

In an attempt to elevate the over crowded conditions at Jail #3, in San Bruno, and other jail facilities, it was decided that the Treasure Island Brig could be renovated to accommodate approximately 136 prisoners.

The decision to use the Treasure Island Brig, was based on the assumption that the Sheriff's Department would be able to close floors 4, 5, and 6 at Jail #3, in San Bruno. The staff from this facility could then be reassigned to Treasure Island. It was assumed that the reduction in operational cost at Jail #3 could be used to offset some of the additional expenses that would be incurred at the Treasure Island facility. Unfortunately, the ability to use Treasure Island Brig is now in question. This is due to the fact that the prisoner count has increased significantly and the ability to close any housing floor at San Bruno does not seem likely. There also are not enough Sworn Officers to staff both facilities.

It was originally anticipated that the Treasure Island Brig would be completed and in operation by December 1998. Although completed, this facility has not yet been placed into operation to house prisoners.

This renovation, as of June 1, 1999, has cost approximately $1,500,000.00 to ready the facility for occupancy. The estimated annual operational cost of this facility would be approximately $5,855,500.00 including Jail Health Service cost. Based on 136 prisoners, the estimated cost would be approximately $134.00 per inmate per day. This inmate cost per day is substantially higher than the other facilities. It is undecided, at this time, when this facility could be put in use.

It is the opinion of the Grand Jury that this facility has not proved to be a practical solution, as was intended. Further expenditures and use of this facility should be carefully considered.

SAN BRUNO JAIL #3

County Jail #3, located at 1 Moreland Drive, San Bruno, became operational July 2, 1934.

The building is six stories in height. In addition to housing facilities for the prisoners, there is a cooking area, laundry, medical dispensary, and office area. When originally constructed, it was intended to house approximately 750 prisoners.

For many years this facility has deteriorated because of obsolescence, unobtainable replacement parts, and lack of funds to adequately maintain the premises. In 1992 and again in 1994 Propositions were presented to the voters of San Francisco for approval to construct a new jail to replace Jail #3. Both Propositions failed to pass.

In May 1991, an "Action" was filed with the United States District Court, Northern District of California. This Action is titled Jones vs. City and County of San Francisco, et. al, No. C91-3453 and is pending before the Honorable William H. Orrick, Jr. This "Action" challenged conditions of confinement at the City's Jail #3 in San Bruno, as being in violation of constitutional requirements.

As the result of this litigation, the number of prisoners has been reduced to 551 and many other items have been or are in the process of being corrected. The key issue is still the replacement of Jail #3.

Due to the failure of the San Francisco voters to approve a bond measure to construct a new jail to replace Jail #3, the City has determined that its only solution is to enter into an agreement with pre-qualified teams. There were five such teams selected and criteria packages, defining the scope of the replacement jail, were sent to them. On December 7, 1998, two teams responded with proposals. Their proposals were evaluated and rated according to objective criteria and on March 12, 1999, the City notified Morse-Diesel International/Prison Realty Trust ("Morse-Diesel") that it had been ranked first and that the City would begin negotiations with it to building the replacement Jail #3. The City anticipates concluding these negotiations and submitting a proposed contract to the Board of Supervisors in the summer of 1999. If negotiations with Morse-Diesel do not result in a proposed contract, the City will then enter into negotiations with the second team, San Bruno Jail LLC, comprised of Salomon, Smith, Barney, and Turner Construction Company. If approved by the Board, the City expects the new jail will be ready for occupancy in the year 2002.

A meeting was held with Deputy City Attorney Joanne Hoeper to discuss the progress being made regarding the construction of the new Jail #3 and the status of the Settlement Agreement. Details regarding the contract for construction of the new jail were not available, except in a general sense, due to negotiations still being conducted. It was disclosed that the new jail would probably be constructed in front of or to the right of the present Jail #3. The structure will be three stories in height and the jail will be of the "Pod" type.

It is the opinion of the Grand Jury that the replacement of Jail #3 is long overdue and action should be taken to replace this facility as soon as possible. Unfortunately, due to the fact that the voters of San Francisco failed to pass a bond issued for the replacement of Jail #3, the cost of the proposed plan will be substantially higher.

SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT, JONES vs. CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO

Pursuant to a Court Order dated February 26, 1999, plaintiffs and defendants, through their counsel, entered into a Settlement Agreement, which has been approved by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. This agreement will culminate the action that was started in May 1991. The Agreement was filed with the United States District Court, Northern District of California on May 3, 1999.

Included as a condition of the Settlement Agreement is a requirement that the City pay damages of $4,200 to each of the seven individually named plaintiffs, for a total of $29,400 and will pay plaintiffs' counsel a total of $585,000 in attorneys' fees for all work done on this action until the date of dismissal by the Court.

Expenses to the City and County of San Francisco, for the services of the Office of the City Attorney, to defend this action, have not been calculated. It is reasonable to expect that these fees could equal or exceed those of the plaintiffs' counsel.

RESPONSES REQUIRED

Mayor

Board of Supervisors

Sheriff

Last updated: 9/15/2009 12:47:33 PM